Patient Advocates Here to Help You and Your Family Navigate the HealthCare System

University of Arizona College of Nursing

RN Patient Advocates is the only nationally recognized Patient Advocacy education program created specifically for qualified RNs endorsed by a leading College of Nursing: The University of Arizona.



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iRNPA Patient Support Medication Support


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RNPA Intensive - Learning Experience

“In a year’s time after taking the RNPA Learning Intensive, my career, my health, my family, my very life has been transformed. I am forever grateful” — Karen DiMarco, RN, iRNPA

“The way of the future of absolute must if you want to make and be the difference in righting the wrongs of healthcare. Kare is a wonderful mentor who has put her soul into this program. Passion, Vision, Perseverance.” — Lana Benton, RN, iRNPA

“The forethought, experience, openness, philosophy and preparation provides all the tools, thought process, and confidence to begin and succeed as an iRNPA.” — Leta Gill, RN, iRNPA

“My experience attending the iRNPA program was a refreshing one, to say the least. This program was packed with life changing information that is not readily taught or available to RN's. This program equipped me with the tools I need to be an iRNPA!  If you are ready for a change after working for many years in the clinical setting, and are driven to help patients and families, this is the program for you!  Karen is a wealth of knowledge that is unmatched in the advocacy process.” — Jamie Long

“Thank you so much for putting together such an incredible RN PA intensive course!  It is truly intensive but so worth it!  I learned a lot and will be using the Medical Time Line and lab spreadsheet with as many clients as i can.  All great information and can’t wait to get my speaking engagements lined up now that I have your fantastic power points!” —  Nan Wetherhorn, Health Care Advisor,

                           News You Can Use                           

Use it or lose it! 32% reduced risk of dementia if you keep your brain very active! 48% greater risk if you do not. Wait! There is more. . .


active-brainA study published in the journal Neurology, described in HealthDay, explains the amazing finding that “one-third of people die in old age with little or no signs of problems with thinking, learning or memory, yet when brain autopsies are done, they actually have clear evidence of Alzheimer's disease” -Robert S. Wilson, Ph.D., professor, neurological sciences and behavioral sciences, Rush University Medical Center)"They [technically] have the disease, but it's not expressed clinically.”

brainHow does doing intellectually challenging activities save your brain function?  Professor Wilson explains “The brain tries to constantly adapt to the challenges it's asked to do. [It] is experience dependent.  Activities that are sustained are going to impact its structure and function. And cognitive circuits that are elaborately structured and functioning very well are able to adapt when the inevitable onslaught of aging occurs."

So how can we do this? Start quilting, tying flies, going birding. Learn Morse code or Italian!  There are thousands of interesting hobbies to develop that engage your brain in learning activities – that include a combination of challenges and the need to focus and concentrate. READ!  Read every day.  Learn something new every day.  Crosswords or Sudoku are okay, but not enough.

And move…daily physical activity is a critical factor as well.

Here’s to saving our brains.  Read on. . .


What’s in your teeth may be causing your high blood pressure…and be a cause factor of heart attacks and strokes. How does that happen?


heart_cuteNicholas Gonzalez, MD, explains: “According to a research paper published in the 2011 issue of The Journal of Clinical Hypertension, mercury affects the heart and blood vessels in several ways:”

  • Mercury in your body increases inflammation
  • It causes thrombosis (the formation of blood clots in the veins)
  • Mercury contributes to abnormal endothelial function (remember that the endothelium is the thin layer of cells that lines the interior surface of your arteries and is a prime indicator of cardiovascular health or disease)
  • Mercury impairs the immune system
  • It interferes with the production of energy in your cells
  • Mercury causes high blood pressure
ekg_heartThe author of the research paper, Mark C. Houston, MD, also explains that “The clinical consequences of mercury toxicity include hypertension, coronary heart disease, myocardial infarction (heart attacks)” and abnormal heart rhythms as well as carotid artery obstructions and strokes.
What are the sources of mercury?  Some of the main ones: blue and striped marlin, swordfish, shark, Atlantic salmon, orange roughy, grouper, Chilean sea bass, and blue fin tuna; vaccines (from multi-dose vials;* you can request single dose vials), some cosmetics, some tattoo dyes; “silver tooth fillings; compact fluorescent light bulbs. 
What to do?  Ask your physician to check for levels of mercury in your body, especially if you have high blood pressure, heart disease or a history of strokes.   The levels of mercury in the body can be evaluated by analyzing the hair, blood and the Provoked Mercury urine test (this one is the gold standard). 
If you still have those “silver” fillings (50% mercury), have them safely removed by a dentist trained in proper removal technique.
Consider taking selenium supplements and fish oil – they both antagonize mercury toxicity.  Increase your body’s ability to fight inflammation by eating more fruits and vegetables.  Increase your intake of antioxidant supplements.

Want to learn more?

Contact us!

RN Patient Advocates, PLLC

3400 West Goret Road
Tucson, AZ 85754
Phone: 520-743-7008